Gallery of the Atlas Mountains

The end of Ramadan is celebrated with a feast, often with a freshly slaughtered lamb. Here is that offering, soon to be prepared into a myriad of specialty dishes.

The end of Ramadan is celebrated with a feast, often with a freshly slaughtered lamb. Here is that offering, soon to be prepared into a myriad of specialty dishes.

The High Atlas is alive with a nomadic shepherd community, with kids as nimble as the sheep they herd. The families ascend to the mountain pastures in the summer months, and descend into the Sahara for the winter.

The High Atlas is alive with a nomadic shepherd community, with kids as nimble as the sheep they herd. The families ascend to the mountain pastures in the summer months, and descend into the Sahara for the winter.

This is Eusf, a nomadic shepherd. You’re looking at most of his life possessions, which pack up easily onto a couple mules for the annual migration from the High Atlas peaks to the Sahara. Hospitality is a foundation of this culture, here is is making tea.

This is Eusf, a nomadic shepherd. You’re looking at most of his life possessions, which pack up easily onto a couple mules for the annual migration from the High Atlas peaks to the Sahara. Hospitality is a foundation of this culture, here is is making tea.

Separating the wheat from the chaff. The cuttings are piled up on a flattened terrace, where mules will be yoked side-by-side and hitched to a central post, where they’ll stomp the kernels of grain from the stalks.

Separating the wheat from the chaff. The cuttings are piled up on a flattened terrace, where mules will be yoked side-by-side and hitched to a central post, where they’ll stomp the kernels of grain from the stalks.

Another scene of threshing grain, pre-John Deere. Here is the line of mules, yoked together and circling a central post. After the mules are done, a pitchfork is used to toss the stomped grain into the wind, with the chaff being blown and the kernels of wheat dropping straight down. And that is how you separate the wheat from the chaff.

Another scene of threshing grain, pre-John Deere. Here is the line of mules, yoked together and circling a central post. After the mules are done, a pitchfork is used to toss the stomped grain into the wind, with the chaff being blown and the kernels of wheat dropping straight down. And that is how you separate the wheat from the chaff.

Nomadic encampment, with sheep and goats.

Nomadic encampment, with sheep and goats.

The tootliween kabobs are sprinkled with salt and pepper over blazing coals stoked with a bellows, then served with fresh bread and mint tea. This is as good as it gets.

The tootliween kabobs are sprinkled with salt and pepper over blazing coals stoked with a bellows, then served with fresh bread and mint tea. This is as good as it gets.

These are tootliween, which are unbelievably delicious kabobs of sheep innards, usually heart, kidney, and lung, intersperse with bits of fat, from a freshly slaughtered lamb.

These are tootliween, which are unbelievably delicious kabobs of sheep innards, usually heart, kidney, and lung, intersperse with bits of fat, from a freshly slaughtered lamb.

Berbers love mint tea. On a longer trek, people carry their own teapots for a rest stop along the path.

Berbers love mint tea. On a longer trek, people carry their own teapots for a rest stop along the path.

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